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Sunday, October 01, 2006

Nikon D80 Review


Photo: Ferra.ru
LocalViewfinder.com has posted quite a nice review of the Nikon D80. My one cavil regarding language would be that the D200 doesn't deserve to be slapped with that horrible bastard moniker "prosumer"; it's more of a semi-pro camera in my opinion. "Prosumer" is a term more often applied to small-sensor cameras that put on airs—compact cameras that aren't compact.

But I digress....

Posted by: MIKE JOHNSTON

7 Comments:

Anonymous Wirehead Arts said...

I view the D80 and D200 as cameras that a real pro probably uses because they figure their clients probably can't tell the difference between the results from that and the results from the D2X or 1Ds Mk II.

But that's just me.

12:49 AM  
Blogger PatrickPerez said...

As far as I know, the etymology of 'prosumer' comes from the video industry, regarding equipment purchased by part-time videographers. Equipment good enough to deliver the quality with certain limitations for day in/day out industrial use. It's been a term that has become misapproriated, but is being used properly in this case. The D80 is certainly capable of 'professional' use in the sense that a photographer can rely on it for a job with a paycheck. No shame in being called prosumer.

1:08 AM  
Blogger MJFerron said...

I have one and it's a wonderful camera. You basically get the D200's image quality, AF and viewfinder, (much better than the d50 or 70) all in a cheaper lighter package. Oh the big LCD and it's zoom features are very cool. I can use AI/AIS lenses some of which are superb on a digital body by using the histogram or blinking highlights feature as a meter. Sure it doesn't have the same pro build but hey most of us take it all too serious anyway. :0

1:24 PM  
Blogger bomath said...

Let's say that in the old days a "pro" would use something like Canon EOS-3ec as the main body; would he get another one for backup? Didn't think so. ;)
Any mount-compatible camera would do, at least as it would have a decent AF (for sports or PJs) and maybe some rubber gaskets, to whitstand the required bashing; usually an EOS-650 would do it.
For Nikon, the "prosumer" twin of the F5 has been F100.

Nobody would dare to name D50 as "prosumer", and the D70(s) has been only an advanced enthusiast camera even if some used it for PJ (mostly thanks to its high-speed flash sync). D200 has all the rights to be named prosumer, being more than reasonable "endowed" for any conceivable task, but lacking the prerequisites for continous/prolonged work as it's missing some features (the direct control buttons, to name the most important thing).

Preventive disclosure: even if I'm a Canon shooter, I think that Nikon makes now (and made for two or three years) the most user-oriented cameras but they're cursed w/ those sensors that come always second to Canon's CMOS.

2:51 PM  
Blogger John Roberts said...

"they figure their clients probably can't tell the difference between the results from that and the results from the D2X or 1Ds Mk II."

Neither can most photographers, if they're honest. Yeah, on a computer screen, at 100% magnification, maybe. Maybe. But that's not the real world. With an 11x14 or 16x20 print at a normal viewing distance - although I'm sure some would claim to see a difference, most of us know better.

3:21 PM  
Blogger Mike Johnston said...

"Let's say that in the old days a "pro" would use something like Canon EOS-3ec as the main body; would he get another one for backup? Didn't think so."

And yet, actually they would. Most pros prefer to have identical bodies as backups. And most have more than one.

--Mike

10:39 PM  
Blogger Morven said...

The argument against having a 'lesser' body as backup is that it's almost unheard of for the lesser bodies in the range to have the same control layout or features. You're going to miss shots if you switch to the backup body, because you'll be adapting to a different set of controls.

It's more tempting now to do so, because pro digital bodies are pricier than pro film, but still, I've heard a lot of people who tried to use e.g. an EOS 30D as backup for an EOS-1Dwhatever, and regretted it.

9:59 AM  

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